Devotional | The Power of Prophecy

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"In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. Now the earth was formless and empty, darkness was over the surface of the deep, and the Spirit of God was hovering over the waters. And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light. God saw that the light was good, and He separated the light from the darkness.” (Genesis 1:1-4 NIV)

Just recently I felt compelled to return to the very beginning of the Bible: Genesis 1. It didn’t disappoint. What an opening! This passage is high drama and action-adventure rolled into one. The scene opens upon a desolate, chaotic “soup of nothingness”, as ‘The Message’ so poetically describes it. There is nothing: no light, no sound, no moon, no stars, no cold breath of wind to accentuate the eeriness of the picture. Nothing. Zilch. Nada. And, to quote Shakespeare (a very wise and astute man), ‘nothing can come of nothing.’ The nothing has no power, nor impetus, to change. And so nothing will remain, for ever more. Or will it?

Then God arrives on the scene and, boy, He sure knows how to make an entrance! There is a pause (for how long we don’t know because time does not yet exist) while He broods, for dramatic effect, perhaps...

Suddenly, He shouts, “Let there be light”; instantly, light explodes into existence. A round of applause please.

What struck me about this passage, quite apart from the incredible power and might of God who, literally, created light, was the means by which He created it. He did not mold light with His hands, nor shoot golden beams from His eyes. No, God spoke light into life. It was His word that carried the creative power to make something out of nothing. God’s word isn’t powerful; God’s word IS power itself! Creative power. Something out of nothing power.

And God is still speaking today, through a myriad of different mouthpieces. The Bible shows us several examples: angels, burning bushes, even donkeys speak the word of God, and, yes, people too. In the Old Testament these people were called prophets. In the New Testament every believer is commanded to “eagerly desire gifts of the spirit, especially prophecy” (1 Corinthians 14:1 NIV). We can all prophesy. The creative power of God’s word is not diminished simply because He uses a frail human intermediary to speak it.

The transformative power of God is transported to us neatly packaged in prophetic words. Unfortunately, this is a fact often missed. This is because we do not judge prophecy according to scripture, but according to our present reality. We receive a word, just as Gideon did, that we are a “mighty warrior”, and then look upon ourselves, nerdy, skinny, glasses wearing, weaklings, and assume that whoever gave the word ate something strange that evening. But this is not the case. Let us return to Gideon as an example. When God spoke to him in Judges 6, calling him a “mighty warrior”, Gideon had never once fought a battle. He was not, in that moment, a warrior. But after receiving the creative agent of God’s word, he was duly transformed into a general, the judge of all Israel. 

Likewise when we receive prophetic words, we may look upon ourselves and see emptiness, chaos and nothingness, and rightly conclude that we have no power, within ourselves, to change. However, this does not invalidate the prophecy. The word itself carries the very power needed to create that which it describes. All that is required of us is that we believe and agree with what the word says.

Have you received any prophetic words? Are there any prophecies you’ve discarded because they don’t match up with your present reality? Go back and re-read the words that God has spoken to you. If you haven’t already, make the choice to believe in His supernatural ability to bring them to fruition.